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The Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows

The word sadness originally meant fullness," to be filled to the brim with some intensity of experience. It's not about despair, or distraction, or controlling how you're supposed to feel, it's about awareness. Setting the focus to infinity and taking it all in, joy and grief all at once; feeling the world as it is, the word as it could be. The unknown and the unknowable, closeness and distance and trust, and the passage of time. And all the others around you who are each going through the same thing.

The Romans called it lacrimae rerum, the "tears of things." We call them obscure sorrows.

"I read the dictionary. I thought it was a poem about everything."

—Steven Wright

Irrition

Irrition

n.
regret at having cracked the code of something, which leaves you wishing you could forget the pattern—longing to unsee an optical illusion, to unlearn the formula behind your favorite songs and shows and movies, or re-canonize a role model you made the mistake of meeting in person.

Tahitian iriti, to translate + iriti, to be convulsed. Pronounced “ih-ri-shun.”

Plata Rasa

Trumspringa

The Til

Jouska

Exulansis

La Cuna

Gobo

Wildred

Zielschmerz

Harmonoia

Treachery Of The Common

Ringlorn

Enterhood

Watashiato

Anecdoche

Xeno

Lockheartedness

Sitheless

Heartspur

Rückkehrunruhe

Endzoned

Ledsome

Halfwise

Incidental Contact High

Keta

Volander

Liberosis