The Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows

The word sadness originally meant fullness," to be filled to the brim with some intensity of experience. It's not about despair, or distraction, or controlling how you're supposed to feel, it's about awareness. Setting the focus to infinity and taking it all in, joy and grief all at once; feeling the world as it is, the word as it could be. The unknown and the unknowable, closeness and distance and trust, and the passage of time. And all the others around you who are each going through the same thing.

The Romans called it lacrimae rerum, the "tears of things." We call them obscure sorrows.

"I read the dictionary. I thought it was a poem about everything."

—Steven Wright

Daguerreologue

Daguerreologue

n.
an imaginary conversation with an old photo of yourself, in which you might offer them a word of advice—to banish your worries, soak it all in, or shape up before it’s too late—or maybe just ask them if they thought you had done justice to the life they built for you.

From daguerreotype, a form of early portrait photography + dialogue. Pronounced “duh-gair-uh- lawg.”

Ameneurosis

Exulansis

Looseleft

Elsewise

Kairosclerosis

Aubadoir

Harmonoia

Wildred

Foreclearing

Ringlorn

Ne’er-Be-Gone

Zielschmerz

Waldosia

Backmasking

Attriage

Dolorblindness

Suente

Covalent Bond

Hiddled

Incidental Contact High

Insoucism

Anaphasia

Mithenness

Proluctance

Hobsmacked

Ecstatic Shock

Siso