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The Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows

The word sadness originally meant fullness," to be filled to the brim with some intensity of experience. It's not about despair, or distraction, or controlling how you're supposed to feel, it's about awareness. Setting the focus to infinity and taking it all in, joy and grief all at once; feeling the world as it is, the word as it could be. The unknown and the unknowable, closeness and distance and trust, and the passage of time. And all the others around you who are each going through the same thing.

The Romans called it lacrimae rerum, the "tears of things." We call them obscure sorrows.

"I read the dictionary. I thought it was a poem about everything."

—Steven Wright

Aftersome

Aftersome

adj.
astonished to think back on the bizarre sequence of accidents that brought you to where you are today—as if you’d spent years bouncing down a Plinko pegboard, passing through a million harmless decision points, any one of which might’ve changed everything—which makes your long and winding path feel fated from the start, yet so unlikely as to be virtually impossible.

Swedish eftersom, because.

Ameneurosis

Idlewild

Gobo

Ghough

Volander

The Til

Treachery Of The Common

Gobo

Funkenzwangsvorstellung

Funkenzwang-svorstellung

Ghough

Foreclearing

Ne’er-Be-Gone

Backmasking

Maugry

Jouska

Fardle-Din

Mal De Coucou

Lilo

Candling

Los Vidados

Backmasking

Present-Tense

Anecdoche

Inerrata

Heartspur

Waldosia

Grayshift